Wintery Knight

…integrating Christian faith and knowledge in the public square

How can you convince a high school student to study something useful?

You can give them this book by Captain Capitalism.

Excerpt:

Graduation is coming up.  Lots of little kinder will be graduating and off to bigger and better things.  Matter of fact many of you probably have little kinder graduating or even nieces, nephews or neighborhood kids you’ve seen grow up over the years.  Regardless, the question is what do you get them for a graduation gift?  Very simple.  “Worthless.”

My regular readers already know what Worthless is about, but for those of you unfamiliar with the book it is THE SINGLE MOST IMPORTANT BOOK high school and college-age kids can read.  It IS the perfect graduation gift and I do not say that out of hyperbole or salesmanship. I say it because I believe it’s true.  “Worthless” is the perfect graduation gift.

The reason why is very simple.  Millions of kids make a huge and life-destroying decision every year – they major in a worthless subject.  Take your emotions or feelings out of it.  In today’s economy, we really cannot afford the luxury of sparing their feelings and lying to them, saying,

“Hey kid, follow your heart and the money will follow.  You’re going to be a great French Art History major!”

as we nervously put on a fake smile hiding our concern.

The amount of money they (or you) are going to spend on tuition, not to mention the sheer volume of their youth they will spend pursuing a degree, can NOT be wasted simply because nobody had the courage to tell the kids the truth about economics and the realities of the labor market.

But you don’t have to.  The book will do it for it you.

“Worthless” explains first and foremost to the reader that the reason somebody got them this book is because that person really cares about them.  And while it may not be what they want to hear, they will end up appreciating it in the future.  “Worthless” also goes into detail and explains in clear, understandable language the economics behind the labor market, showing the reader how and why some degrees are worthwhile and others are literally worthless.

The book is $13 in paperback and only $5 on Kindle.  A miniscule fraction of the tuition and time costs of earning a four year degree.  Because of its potential to prevent kids from making a VERY costly mistake, the cheap price practically compels you to at least consider it.

So do a graduate you care about a huge favor.  Buy them “Worthless” for a graduation gift.  And if you’re so kind, do me a favor and simply spread the word by sending people this post.

You do not want to have someone you love go off to college and study things that don’t lead to a job. You especially don’t want them to rack up tens of thousands of dollars in student loans only to be unemployed after graduating.

Filed under: Commentary, , , , , , , , , , ,

6 Responses

  1. Of course, I bought the Kindle book. It’s GREAT. Unfortunately, by High School, it’s too late for too many teenagers. First, the ones who can read are a minuscule minority …

  2. Matt says:

    Looks like an interesting book. I might have to look into getting it for my high-school-aged sister…

  3. say, thanks for the tip. Happily, my niece who just graduated high school is planning on a nursing degree, but still, she could be tempted to change her mind in the near future. I’ll be looking at this book.

    cheers!
    Lin

  4. WaterRat says:

    I agree with a lot of it in principle. My only quibble is that there are those who are clearly gifted in the arts and for whom pursuing a degree in such is a worthwhile endeavor – those who perform music would be an example, or those who have a desire to teach said subjects at any grade level. We can’t ALL be science, tech and the like. :)

    • If a person can make a career of it like Justice Clarence Thomas or Professor Robert George, then they should do the arts. But if they are going there to make Bs and Cs en route to a job as a barrrrrista, then forget about it.

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