Wintery Knight

…integrating Christian faith and knowledge in the public square

A quote from Cold Case Christianity, by J. Warner Wallace

Cold-Case Christianity by J. Warner Wallace

Cold-Case Christianity by J. Warner Wallace

Here it is, from page 51:

As I speak around the country, I often encounter devoted, committed Christians who are hesitant to embrace an evidential faith. In many Christian circles, faith that requires evidential support is seen as weak and inferior. For many, blind faith (a faith that simply trusts without question) is the truest, most sincere, and most valuable form of faith that we can offer God. Yet Jesus seemed to have a high regard for evidence. In John 14:11, He told those watching Him to examine “the evidence of miracles” (NIV) if they did not believe what He said about His identity. Even after the resurrection, Jesus stayed with His disciples for an additional forty days and provided them with “many convincing proofs” that He was resurrected and was who He claimed to be (Acts 1:2-3 NIV). Jesus understood the role and value of evidence and the importance of developing an evidential faith. It’s time for all of us, as Christians, to develop a similarly reasonable faith”.

So far, the book is written in a very engaging tone with lots of detective stories and crime scenes. He focused so far on 1) the role of presuppositions, especially naturalism, 2) the abductive method of reasoning, 3) the minimal facts (he chose death, empty tomb, appearances, transformed lives/resurrection proclamation), and 4) a list of naturalistic scenarios and what is wrong with them.

One concern I have so far is that he quoted Matthew 27 (the guard at the tomb) to support the empty tomb. That is one of the least defensible parts of the New Testament. You cannot just use that to refute a naturalistic theory without qualifying it. It worries me that he used that passage without qualifying it. But his general approach is a minimal facts approach, so that’s good and defensible.

Oh, don’t panic all of you, I am an inerrantist. But you can’t argue like that with non-Christians.

Filed under: Commentary, , , , , , , , , , ,

2 Responses

  1. mmmne4 says:

    Just one man’s opinion:

    Any debate about the empty tomb doesn’t concern me much for at least two reasons:

    1) The body of Jesus was never found.
    2) It offers no explanation whatsoever for the numerous, detailed experiences of Christ’s post Resurrection appearances.
    3) It offers no explanation whatsoever for the radical transformation of the disciples, particularly Paul and James who were far from being believers when Jesus was alive.

    Actually, that’s three reasons….

  2. mmmne4 says:

    I like your way of thinking in that anything presented as fact is good and solid and doesn’t simply meet minimum standards for proof.

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